Follow by Email

Monday, 26 September 2016

Christy Clarke -- BC's disaster

Mt. Polley, #2, waiting, waiting ...

Watch the video...

The worst environmental disasters in BC’s history.

It’s moments like this when British Columbians need their politicians to lead and take responsibility. Unfortunately, we’ve seen the opposite from Christy Clark.

I’d like to share with you what people are saying about the differences between John Horgan and Christy Clark during this crisis:

The best Clark could muster with was a 21-word Tweet the next day… It was re-Tweeted four times, probably by staffers, which tells you how well her distant concern played.”
    -Stephen Hume, Vancouver Sun

“…the premier has not been seen since Monday's breach of the tailings pond… Though Horgan hustled quickly to the spill site for meetings and news events, Clark let Mines Minister Bill Bennett take the lead, while she stayed out of the public eye in Vancouver.”
   -Michael Smyth, The Province

“Clark was finally bound for Likely as I wrote this, but probably too late to undo public perception. Opposition leader John Horgan, acting like a decisive premier rather than an indifferent celebrity, has already been there.

While the Liberals were clucking like Chicken Little, Horgan was calling for full disclosure of all government records relating to environmental assessments and approvals, something more likely to resonate than the premier's tweet of concern.”
    -Stephen Hume, Vancouver Sun


“[John Horgan] has called for the government to release all its records and reports on the development, monitoring and enforcement regarding the failed tailings pond dam. Starting the inevitable investigation by opening this process to public scrutiny sounds like a very good idea and it should be extended to federal records, too.”
    -Vancouver Sun Editorial

When the Premier finally showed up in Likely BC, it was with an army of communications staff and a tightly scripted photo-op designed to put the mess behind her. Not surprisingly, she had no good answers for the women and men who earn their livings in the region.